Sunday, December 11, 2011

Birding 12-10- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

I have noticed in the past few weeks that the ducks seem to have favorite places. Gadwall and Northern Pintail   prefer Willow Creek. Canvasback and Redhead and Goldeneyes seem to prefer Mountain Falls. I had one of the most exciting birding experiences today. It was wonderful to be out birding. I started off seeing the Golden Eagle at the entrance to Willow Creek. He then flew down to Pahrump Valley Blvd. I followed him and watched him fly down Pahrump Valley Blvd from telephone pole to telephone pole. When I first saw the Peregrine Falcon, he was at the top of a Cottonwood tree. The sun was on him and the only thing I could see for sure was the outline of his tail. I thought at first it was the Red-shouldered Hawk. As I moved closer, I could see some markings on his  face and then he flew off. I thought then that it might be a Peregrine because of his swift flight, and I then started walking in the direction he flew. Shortly thereafter. I found him at the top of another Cottonwood, and this is when I started taking pictures.

The following birds were seen today in Pahrump at Mountain Falls and Willow Creek (Total 45):

Pied-billed Grebe
Black-crowned Night Heron
Mallard
Northern Pintail (1 male and 2 females)
Gadwall (1 male)
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Ring-necked Duck
Canvasback (3 males and 6 females)
Redhead (1 male)
Common Goldeneye
Ruddy Duck
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk (light juvenile)
Golden Eagle (Willow Creek and Pahrump Valley Blvd)
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon (Willow Creek)
Gambel's Quail
American Coot
Rock Dove (Feral Pigeons) stopped counting at 500
Eurasian-Collared Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Red-naped Sapsucker
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Common Raven
Horned Lark
Verdin
Red-breasted Nuthatch
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Crissal Thrasher
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco (5) Oregon
White-crowned Sparrow
Western Meadowlark
Red-winged Blackbird
Brewer's Blackbird
Great-tailed Grackle
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
American Goldfinch

Submitted by


Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, November 21, 2011

Birding 11-19- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

November 19, 2011, five us met at the Willow Creek Parking lot and birded together. It was a active day for hawks.
I would like to thank Richard and Carol Cantino, Kristie Abromowitz and Debby Woodland for birding with me. It was a great day to bird!

We had some identification issues which I am listing here as they were different in so many ways. The Red-shouldered Hawk was not vocal at all today and we had trouble locating him.

The Prairie Falcon was sitting in a Cottonwood tree and was all puffed up because of the cold. He was watching the Rock Pigeons and did not make any attempt to go after them for about ten minutes. At first I thought he might be an immature Peregrine Falcon, but then he flew  out of the tree and sailed out to travel out the course before us, I could see the dark armpits.

The American Kestrel flew quickly across the field and landed in a Cottonwood tree, he was mostly covered by tree leaves which is not usual for the Kestrel's I see at Willow Creek as I usually see them sitting out in the open on telephone wires or branches of trees.  I was on the right side of the Cottonwood tree and could only see the breast and one part of the wing. The breast was rufous with blue gray in the wing. I could not see the face or the tail.  I also did not see him clearly when he flew into the tree so I did not get an idea of his size. Debby said he looked small to her when he flew so I was beginning to think this might be a falcon.When I went on the side of the tree, that Carol was on, I could see  the face and see that it was an American Kestrel. Carol, already knew it was an American Kestrel, but she had not said anything to me yet as I thought it might be a Cooper's Hawk.

We learned why the American Kestrel, was so hidden, he came out of the tree, into a hovering position and then down to pick up a mouse and landed on another Cottonwood tree and started eating his breakfast.

The Northern Harrier, was flying very high and I am use to Harrier's in this area  flying lower.  I thought he was a  Red-tailed Hawk at first as he was so high we could not identify him at all. There was no side to side teetering to identify him as a Harrier. His wings were slightly drooped. Then he dropped down suddenly with his wings swept back and I could see that he was a Northern Harrier by his rump and gray back and the motion of his wings.

As we turned around a Red-tailed Hawk was trying to get away from a Common Raven that was chasing it

I was not sure we were going to see any hawks because of the coolness of the start of the morning, but when it warmed up the hawks all seemed to be active in the one area we were birding in. This is unusual in itself as it usually takes at least 3-4 hours to see this many hawks at one time.

Birds species seen today (32)

Pied-billed Grebe (eating a fish)
Great-Blue Heron
Mallard
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Ring-necked Duck
Ruddy Duck
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Prairie Falcon
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Greater Roadrunner
Hummingbird (was not identified)
Red-naped Sapsucker
Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Say's Phoebe
Common Raven
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Pipit
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's and Myrtle's)
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored (2) Oregon (3)
Western Meadowlark
Red-winged Blackbird
Great-tailed Grackle
Brewer's Blackbird
House Finch
House Sparrow

Submitted by

Darlene Feener

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

Willow Creek: Pahrump: November 6th, 2011

November 6, 2011

A raw cold morning of birding. Stopped by Richard's and Carol's to warm up. They treated me to pancakes and coffee which was greatly appreciated.

Birds are listed in the order they were seen.

Gambel's Quail
Common Raven
Rock Dove
Mourning Dove
White-crowned Sparrow
American Kestrel
Great-Tailed Grackle
American Coot
Black-Crowned-Night Heron
Mallard
Red-Shouldered Hawk
American Wigeon
Killdeer
Swallow unidentified
Yellow-Rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
Brewer's Blackbird
Sharp-Shinned Hawk
Red-Winged Blackbird
Red-Tailed Hawk
Eurasian-Collared Dove
House Finch
Orange-Crowned Warbler
Bewick's Wren
Dark-Eyed Junco (1 Slate-colored) (1 Oregon)
Lesser Goldfinch
Northern Shoveler
Anna's Hummingbird
Burrowing Owl (in the middle of the road on my way home)

Submitted by

Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, October 17, 2011

Birding 10-15- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

Some of the birds seen at Willow Creek today.

Red-tailed Hawk
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk (3)
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Vermillion Flycatcher (female)
Yellow-rumped Warbler's (abundant)
Brewer's Blackbird
Red-winged Blackbird
Song Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Pied-billed Grebe (2)
Bewick's Wren
Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Verdin
Great Blue Heron
Green-winged Teal (5)

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, October 03, 2011

Willow Creek: Pahrump: October 3, 2011

Birding today was beautiful. Hawks are being seen frequently by the people that live around Willow Creek. Two people sought me out to tell me what they had been seeing. Both of the people I talked to had seen the Prairie Falcon's which I saw several weeks ago but did not see today.

I started the day by checking out the Burrowing Owl's which are not on Willow Creek. I took pictures of 4 different owls. I stay in my car so  the owls do not get frightened by my presence. These guys are always a great way to start a morning of birding.

Birds seen on Willow Creek this morning are listed in the order they were seen.

Common Raven
Mourning Dove
Lesser Goldfinch
House Finch
Mallard
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Phainopepla
Brewer's Blackbird
Eurasian-collared Dove
Say's Phoebe
Gambel's Quail
Great-tailed Grackle
Cinnamon Teal
Rock Dove
American Coot
Sharp-shinned Hawk ( a real beauty) He was standing on a limb of a tree overlooking Ed's pond.
House Sparrow
Anna's Hummingbird
Wilson's Warbler
Loggerhead Shrike (this guy was having a great time flying off the telephone lines down to the ground & back up to the lines).
White-crowned Sparrow
Red-shouldered Hawk (2) very vocal, got some great pictures.
Northern Mockingbird (flashing his wings as he flew across the course)
American Kestrel
Ferruginous Hawk

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, September 19, 2011

Birding 9-18- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

Birding started early with three Red-shouldered Hawk's by the clubhouse. The Yellow-breasted Chat was seen at the end of my birding day. He was in the Willow bushes, down low next to the water. It was a male. He did not stay long enough to get a picture. He disappeared back into the brush. I spent 30 minutes looking for him but could not find him again. This sighting was  seen at the second pond from Richard and Carol Cantino's home. Last week Carol, told me she had seen a bright yellow bird in the trees, but could not find it.

I was very happy to see two Prairie Falcon's. I did get pictures of one of them. It has been a year since I have seen them at Willow Creek.

Other birds seen: Crissal Thrasher, American Kestrel, Red-tailed Hawk, Say's Phoebe, Black Phoebe, Snowy Egret's (3) Cinnamon Teal's Orange-crowned Warbler, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, White-crowned Sparrow, Song Sparrow and a American Goldfinch.

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, September 05, 2011

Birding 9-04- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

I started out early this morning and came upon an auto accident going into Pahrump. Helicopters were busy with the injured.

I tried to get into birding but found it difficult to concentrate as I could hear the helicopters and the police sirens.

Coming home from birding hours later, another accident in the same general area. My thoughts are with those that were involved in the two accident's.

I checked on the Burrowing Owls. Seven of them were out. They are not at Willow Creek. They are in a different area of Pahrump. I saw 4 adults and 3 juveniles. The juveniles are very dark compared to the adults. Must be from the time they spend in their burrows.

I have to go out to another area to check for a Burrowing Owl burrow, as they are flying across the street at night when we go into town or come home.
Birds seen today at Willow Creek:

The Red-shouldered Hawk was the first bird of the day, sitting at the top of a Willow tree.
A Black Phoebe was sailing out for insects from a post in one of the ponds.
Anna's Hummingbirds were everywhere.
American Kestrel's together, moving about Willow Creek. Saw three together at one time.
Say's Phoebe
Red-winged Blackbirds
Black-crowned Night Heron
Bank Swallow
Verdin
Crissal Thrasher
Yellow Warbler (male)
Northern Mockingbird

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, August 01, 2011

Birding 7-31- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

I birded for two hours this morning. It was a very active morning for hawks.

Sharp-shinned Hawk (1)
Cooper's Hawk (1)
Red-shouldered Hawk (2)
Red-tailed Hawk (3)
American Kestrel (2)
Osprey (1)

I also saw the Great Blue Heron, which I have not seen in a while. On the way home I stopped by to check on the Burrowing Owls.

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevad

Monday, May 23, 2011

Birding 5-22- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

May 22, 2011 birding started at 6a.m. with a light wind and overcast skys,
clearing and warming as the day progressed.

These birds were the high point of my day.

Townsend's Warbler
Gray Vireo
Western Wood Pewee
Red-shouldered Hawks
Ladder-backed Woodpeckers (very active, male and female all over the trees)

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevad

Monday, May 16, 2011

Birding 5-15- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

May 15, 2011 at Willow Creek started off with five ravens,making loud
calling sounds and following me down the path to the second pond. Flying
closely over my head, it was a bit distracting as they were making way too
much noise for 6a.m. in the morning. There was an active nest, several
weeks ago with one young raven in it. Today I did not approach the nest and
was a distance away from it when the five of them approached me. I noticed
later in the morning, that three Ravens, flew over other people that were
in the same area and the Ravens, were exhibiting the same kind of behavior
they did with me.

Migrating bird seen today was a single Spotted Sandpiper.

New summer arrivals this birding session:
Bullock's Oriole, Western Wood Pewee and Yellow Warbler

Nesting birds:(not all listed)
Black Crowned Night Heron's
Western Kingbird, in the fork of a tall Cottonwood tree, sitting on the
nest.

Bird's with food in their mouths:
Bewick's Wren, Northern Mockingbird, and Verdins

Adult bird's with juveniles:
Black-crowned Night Heron (1) adult and (1) young Black-crowned Night Heron
Blue Gray Gnatcatcher (1) adult and (2) juveniles moving about the mesquite.
Greater Roadrunner (1) adult and (1)juvenile
Mallard (2) adults with (1) juvenile and (1) adult with (5) juveniles

Falcons/Hawks

American Kestrel (1)
Prairie Falcon (1)
Cooper's Hawk (1)
Red-shouldered Hawk (2)
Red-tailed Hawk (1)

A Tree swallow was flying with Violet-green Swallow's and Barn Swallow's
when one Tree swallow, landed briefly on the ground beside a male mallard
to pick up a single white feather and flew off with it.

A Prairie Falcon, flew into the top of a Cottonwood tree and a Bullock's
Oriole, male flew into the same tree two branches away from it at the top
of the tree. (I liked the contrast of these two birds, so I took pictures).

After leaving Willow Creek, I went to the South of Pahrump to check on
Burrowing Owls. A friend earlier in the week told me there were now 4
pairs. When I arrived today, I viewed them from the inside of my vehicle.
There were two Burrowing Owl's present with one at one burrow and another
one a little distance away at another burrow. These owls are making their
home on a lot of land that could possibly hold 2-3 homes. The people who
live in the neighborhood are very attentive to the safety of the owls.

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, April 18, 2011

Birding report for April 17, 2011.

Birding trip on 4-17/2011 started at 6:30a.m. with a goal to search for active bird's nests.

Verdin, going in and out of it's nest.
Crissal Thrasher's (2) on top of bush, with one Thrasher having some kind of food in it's beak.
Western Bluebird's in and out of hole on a dead Cottonwood tree.
Black-crowned Night Heron's making nests.
Anna's Hummingbird nest seen at next door neighbor's house of Richard & Carol with Anna's Hummingbird returning to it's  nest and us quickly leaving nest area.
Pied-billed Grebe's (2) one in and out of marsh grass.
Western Kingbird, with building material in beak.
Cinnamon Teal's male and female investigating covered area of pond.
Ladder backed Woodpecker's male and female moving around and up a
Cottonwood tree where there was a woodpecker hole.
Sharp-shinned Hawk gliding over the pond.
Cowbird's perched at the top of a Cottonwood tree.

Bird's returning this week:
White-faced Ibis (13)
Belted Kingfisher (1)

For those that would like to go on a excellent bird walk,
check out Len Warren's web site; Birds of Shoshone Wetlands at
birdman88-birdsofshoshonewetlands.blogspot.com
Len,leads a excellent free bird walk and is comfortable leading and teaching all age levels about the bird's in Shoshone, California, which is about 40 minutes from Pahrump.

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, April 11, 2011

Birding report for April 10, 2011.

Morning temperature was 30 degrees when I left home at 6:10 a.m.

Summer birds, winter birds and resident birds made for an interesting quiet
morning of birding broken by episodes of  Red wing Blackbird's and Yellow
headed Blackbirds and Canadian geese who were calling along with the Black-
crowned Night Heron's who were making loud woc sounds. I sat on the grass
for awhile to listen to them, and I saw two at the edge of the pond and
when I started scanning the tree's found five more. (One was what looked
like a first spring night heron with no black in the head or on the mantle.
The other six were adults.
I wondered if the first spring night heron was the one Richard and Carol
raised after it fell from it's nest last year.

Birds listed below are the birds that were seen from 6:30a.m. to 9:30a.m.
at Willow Creek.

American Goldfinch (male)
Tree Swallows
Yellow-rumped Warbler's (Audubon)They were in almost every tree.
Great Egret at top of a  tall tree near pond.The long plumes extended down
his back beyond his tail. The sun shining on him made for a great picture.
Western Kingbird's
Brown headed Cowbird's
Bullock's Oriole at the top of a Cottonwood tree.
Red-naped Sapsucker
Pied Billed Grebe's
Western Bluebird's
Cinnamon Teal (male)
Black Phoebe's
Say's Phoebe
Brewer's Blackbird
Northern Mockingbird's (2)
Anna's Hummingbird
Yellow-headed Blackbird's
Mourning Dove's
Black chinned Hummingbird
Verdin
Song Sparrow's (2)
American Kestrel
Black-crowned Night Heron's (7) at Ed's pond making lots of noise.
Gambel's Quail
House Finch
Common Raven
Lesser Goldfinch
Red winged Blackbird's
Great tailed Grackle's
White crowned Sparrow's
Eurasian Collared Dove
Rock Dove's (one was pure white with a white and black striped tail pattern)

The Northern Shoveler's have appeared to have left Willow Creek. Carol and
I discussed the American Wigeon's Richard said there were three this
morning on their ponds.
On my way home I stopped at the Mountain Falls ponds and 95 American
Wigeon's were seen there.


Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, April 04, 2011

Birding 3-03- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)


A blue sunny sky and clear water in all the ponds which showed reflection
of the trees all budding out. The area I walked today seemed to be cast in
a golden yellow on this wonderful birding morning.

The first bird of the day at the top of a fir tree filled with pine cones
was a Red-breasted Nuthatch, and right next to him on the same branch but a
little higher was a beautiful Yellow-rumped Warbler (male) (Audubon's)

As I walked around I was met by a Cooper's hawk making lots of noise as it
flew over my head and then I saw a second Cooper's hawk with its red brown
breast puffed out with white fluff hanging down around it's legs not far
from a nest.

In the Cottonwood tree at the top of the tree was a male House Finch with a
male Lesser Goldfinch sitting next to it on the same branch.

Northern Shoveler's spinning in the pond amongst male and female Cinnamon
Teal's swimming on the same pond.

Red-shouldered Hawk hidden amongst the new green growth of the tree it was
in. With a second Red-shouldered Hawk not far away.

Western Bluebird's were flitting from fir tree to a stump on the ground
amidst the White-Crowned Sparrow's on the ground.

A Black Phoebe at the top of a Cottonwood tree.Made be think of a gentlemen
all dressed out in his tuxedo.

Say's Phoebe flapping midair with a Raven below it on the ground.

Black-crowned Night Heron's sitting in the greenery and  a Anna's
Hummingbird, with the sun glinting off it's head giving an appearance of
shimmering rose red.

A Northern Flicker (red-shafted) with it's head held out from the tree
displaying it's black mustache and the red crescent on the back of it's
crown.

A tiny Verdin, bounding across the path in front of me to a tree which held
a Phainopepla.

Black-chinned Hummingbird and a Bewick's wren sharing the same habitat.

Pied-billed Grebe's and American Coot's sharing the same pond with their
diving activities.

Red-winged Blackbird's sitting amongst the golden marsh grass.

Two male Ruddy Duck's swimming together when a flock of Yellow-headed
Blackbird's landed in the marsh grass near them. The contrast of yellow,
black, white, blue and reddish brown, was startling and made me realize how
lucky I am to be experience such beauty.

Brewer's Blackbirds on the ground feeding with Brown-headed Cowbird's

Male Mallard's with American Wigeon's swimming in the same pond. The
Mallard's head were an emerald green with the sun shinning on them.

Killdeer with display activity crouched on the green grass near the pond.

Gambel's Quail amongst the Lilac and White Bearded Iris in Richard &Carol's
yard.

House Sparrows, moving among the red Ranunculus flowers in Richard &
Carol's yard, with orange fish in the small pond in their front yard.

Mourning Dove's and Eurasian-Collared Dove's sharing the same space on a
tree.

Tree Swallow's skimming over the pond an then soaring over the Cottonwood
tree with Great-tailed Grackle's sitting in them.

As I headed back to my car, a Crissal Thrasher, was at the top of a
telephone pole singing with its rusty red rump clearly visible as it
flipped it's tail up as I passed underneath it.

A Song Sparrow popping out of the bushes.

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Basic homemade dish soap

½ C of Soap Shavings (or Soap ‘Flakes’) I use a bar of our homemade bar soap!
3 C Water
4 tsp lemon juice or white vinegar

Its a good idea to keep an old pot around for making homemade cleaning stuff. Mark it well so no one uses it for cooking.  Pour your water and soap shavings in it and heat up to a medium temperature, slowly. Stir, and keep heating until all soap is melted, do not boil. Remove from heat, allow your mixture to cool a little and then add in your lemon juice or vinegar stir and allow to sit in the pot until completely cooled. Pour into a plastic bottle or old dish soap bottle, shake and it’s voila! 

Monday, March 28, 2011

Birding 3-27-2011 Willow Creek: Pahrump: Nye County

March 27, 2011, started off before sunrise. I spent a lot of time taking pictures of a unidentified woodpecker. Pictures were not good today. I did something wrong and will have to check with Richard. Anyway, Carol, joined me and we had a wonderful time birding Willow Creek.

We had some surprises. I was not expecting to see two Red Crossbills, one a male and one a female. Also the Vermillion Flycatcher returned today, it was a male and he was just beautiful. Also saw a Black throated Gray Warbler.  He was a nice surprise. It was a very active morning with lots of
birds moving. I wish to thank Richard Cantino for all the help he gave me this morning with woodpecker pictures I took last Sunday at Willow Creek.Carol, is a lot of fun to bird with and she hears way more than I do. We make a good birding pair. She is also quick to find the birds that I point out to her. She is a great birder friend. She makes me laugh.

Listing of birds seen today at Willow Creek
Vermillion Flycatcher
Red Crossbills
Black throated Gray Warbler
Woodpecker sp.
Pied billed Grebe's
Canada Goose
Northern Shoveler
Ruddy Duck
Northern Harrier
Red-shouldered Hawk
American Kestrel
Gambel's Quail
American Coot's
Anna's Hummingbird
Northern Flicker's
Ladder-backed Woodpecker's two a beautiful male and female(plus one more)
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoeve
Common Raven
Horned Lark
Mourning Dove
Eurasian-collarded Dove
Tree Swallow's
Bushtit's
White-breasted Nuthatch
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Western Bluebirds
Northern Mockingbird
Phainopepla
European Starling
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warblers everywhere (Audubon's]
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco's (2) slate colored and {5} Oregon
White-crowned Sparrow's
Red-winged Blackbird's
Yellow-headed Blackbird's
Great-tailed Grackle's
Brown headed Cowbird's
Houes Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Submitted by
Darlene Feener

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Birding 3-20-2011 Willow Creek: Pahrump: Nye County

March 20, 2011, birding started at 7:15a.m. with a strong wind,blowing spitting rain and tumbleweeds around. Lots of activity in parking lot with Cooper's Hawk nestled in the fir tree overseeing everything. Slate-colored Junco's along with Western Bluebirds, flitting from tree to tree. An American Kestrel was hovering with the wind blowing it around. A woodpecker flattened itself against the tree motivating me to get out of the vehicle. This was a female.

After conversation yesterday with a birding group in California, I was alert to looking at the woodpeckers more closely. Was able to get pictures, but she flew before I could get a look at her forehead. Had a wider black band at base of neck and appeared to have more black in the face. After looking for an hour at home on the computer,at the four pictures I took I came to believe it was a Ladder-backed and that the wind was giving the woodpecker the appearance of a wider solid black than what I am use to seeing.Thank you Richard and Carol for coffee and the pancakes after my birding. It sure did warm me up. Also thank you Richard for the instructions on the GPS.

1.Slate colored Junco's (3) at clubhouse and (2) at Carol&Richard's feeders.
Orgeon Junco's (2)(took pictures)(also at Carol and Richard's)
2.Golden-crowned Sparrow (1) at Carol&Richard's feeders. This sparrow comes
into their feeders when the White-crowned Sparrow's come in to feed.(Took
pictures)
3.Ring-billed Gull's at Richard and Carol's pond. (3)
4.Cinnamon Teal's (3) 1 male and two females. Pond (2) Richard and Carol's
5.Black-crowned Night Heron's building nest in Willow Tree second pond at
Richard and Carol's I was surprised at the size of the limbs that the
Black-crowned Night Heron's were tearing off & carrying to the nest site.
6.Northern Shoveler's spinning around on the ponds.
7.Red-shouldered Hawk sitting in nest.
8.Anna's Hummingbirds
9.House Finch
10.House Sparrow's
11.Black Phoebe's
12.Say's Phoebe
13.Lesser Goldfinch
14.Ladder-backed Woodpecker
15.Western Bluebirds
16.Cooper's Hawk
17.American Kestrel
18.Yellow-rumped Warbler's
19.Common Raven's
20.Rock Dove's
21.Northern Pintail (female) with male Mallard (think she may be a hybrid
between Northern Pintail and Mallard)
22.Gambel's Quail (1) swaying on a tumbleweed bush trying to stay upright
with the wind blowing.
23.Red-winged Blackbird's
24.Brewer's Blackbird (1)
25.Great-tailed Grackle's
26.American Wigeon's
27.Mallard's
28.Eurasian-collared Dove's calling
29.Western Meadowlarks, on a fence trying to withstand the wind.
30.Pied-billed Grebe's

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, March 14, 2011

Birding 3-13-2011 Willow Creek: Pahrump: Nye County

The following birds were seen on March 13, 2011 at Willow Creek which is a inactive golf course at this time in Pahrump,Nevada.

The Peregrine Falcon, came zooming between me and a Rock Pigeon. I turned around and he was at the top of a very tall tree. I took two quick shots, of the tail and when it moved to another branch a full body shot. For the first time ever, I used my camera instead of my binos. I ifted my bino's and before I could identify it accurately it flew off. It was cold this morning so I moved on to the other birds I saw moving ahead of me thinking about the speed of the bird that I had just seen. When I downloaded the pictures to the computer this evening I was delighted that it was a Peregrine Falcon. The ponds have more duck's on them and there are more Rock Pigeon's present so maybe I will see the Peregrine Falcon more often.

I saw a total of 181 Brown-headed Cowbirds, which did not make me happy at all. They were mixed in with Red-wing Blackbird's and Brewer's Blackbird's. I usually see only 1-10 Brown-headed Cowbird's a year in Pahrump at Willow Creek. As I was watching them eat, I realized how many Cowbird's there were so I started counting. There were 48 males and 133 females.

The following birds listed below were seen today.

Peregrine Falcon
Rock Pigeon's
Mallard's
American Coot's
House Finch
Common Raven's
House Sparrow's
Great-blue Heron
Yellow-rumped Warbler's
Orange-crowned Warbler
Mourning Dove's
Eurasian Collared Dove's
Northern Pintail
Great-tailed Grackle's
Gambel's Quail
Northern Mockingbird
Northern Flicker
Brewer's Blackbird's
Red-winged Blackbird's
Brown-headed Cowbird's
Say's Phoebe
Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Anna's Hummingbird
Western Meadowlark's
Verdin's
White-crowned Sparrow's
Black Phoebe
Pied-billed Grebe's
Red-shouldered Hawk's
Northern Shoveler's
Ring-necked-Duck's
Lesser Goldfinch
Ruddy Duck

Submitted by
Darlene Feener

Sunday, March 06, 2011

Organic cucuzza seed now available

Cucuzza pronounced "ku-koo-za" or goo gootz" to Italian-Americans is a very long, light green in color, Italian squash that is suddenly all the rage across the globe. The inside of this delicious and nutritious vegetable has a firm white flesh. The taste is a little sweeter and nuttier than other squash. although tastier,  It can be cooked like any other squash.

Our cucuzza are heirloom, organic, open pollinated and have been in our family for over 150 years. They originate in our hometown of Mezzojuso, Sicily.  (Sicilian: Menzujusu)  Mezzojuso is a village in the Province of Palermo in the Italian region of Sicily, located 34 km  (21 miles) southeast of Palermo. Mezzojuso is a stunning hillside village rich in history, art and agriculture.

The cucuzza grows like a vine and needs full sun and a trellis to support it's weight. The vine can grow up to 2 feet per day, the squash can grow up to 10 inches per day and can reach three to four feet in length. Because of the size cucuzza needs a lot of room to grow. They are at their best and most tenders when they  are 2-3 feet long. Our heirloom cucuzza have grown 5-6 feet in length and STILL have been tender !

Today, both traditional and trendy restaurants around the world have embraced cucuzza for both its health benefits and its culinary versatility. We are convinced that our strain is by far superior to any other  cucuzza seeds available

Season for picking: June - November

Buy Cucuzza Seed Here





Popular tomatoes easy to grow with few simple steps - Living - ReviewJournal.com

Tuesday, March 01, 2011

Birding 2-27- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

February 27, 2011 birding started with no rain.I picked up Marie Stewart at
the R.V. park here in Pahrump. We headed over to Richard and Carol
Cantino's so Marie, could get her life bird, the Hooded Warbler.

This past week the Hooded Warbler has changed his daily habits and the only
time for sure that he would be in for meal worms was beween 6:45a.m. and
7:30a.m. Richard and Carol served us Waffles and Turkey Bacon. Birding does
not get any better than this, sitting waiting for the Hooded Warbler to
come in. Sure enough, in he came and Marie, got her Hooded Warbler.
The first American Robin of this year was spotted by Carol Cantino.

After breakfast, Carol, Marie and I headed out onto Willow Creek to bird.
We saw the following birds.

Hooded Warbler (1) male
Dark eyed Junco's (1) Slate-colored) (Bird photographed) (4) Oregon
Canada Goose (1) honking for his fellow geese who appear to have left.
American Wigeon's
Mallard's
Gambel's Quail
Pied-billed Grebe's
Northern Shoveler's
Ruddy Duck's
Great Blue Heron
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk's (2)
American Coot's
Rock Pigeon's
Eurasian Collared-Doves
Anna's Hummingbird's
Red-naped Sapsucker (1)
Ladder backed Woodpecker(2) one making a hole in a tree&pulling himself up
into the hole halfway, to clean out the debris.
Mourning Dove's
Burrowing Owl's
Northern Flicker (red-shafted)
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Tree Swallow
Verdin
Western Bluebird's
Common Raven's
American Robin
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Red-winged Blackbird's
White-crowned Sparrow's
Great-tailed Grackle's
House Finch
House Sparrow
Lesser Goldfinch

Richard, Carol, Marie and myself headed out in the car to check out the
Burrowing Owl's. They are not on Willow Creek. They are outside of the town
of Pahrump, but in the community of Pahrump.

It was a day of wonderful birding, great friends, who provide nourishment
and lots of laughter. Carol and Richard sat discussing camera information
that is way over the head of this begging photographer.Carol and I sat
discussing all the unusual birds we are seeing in their yard. I am thankful
at last that my photos are coming into focus, thanks to Richard's
help.Learning photography is mind boggling, but I love every minute of
everything I can learn about birding.

Thank you Richard, Carol and Marie, for a memorable day of birding.

Submitted by
Darlene FeenerPahrump, Nevada                                  

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Malfatti, A Delicious Mistake

Labor of Love


From Macaroni Kid Eats

Malfatti, A Delicious Mistake
By: Allison Rebenack

Requests from readers for simple and delicious vegetarian recipes brought me back to my childhood. I have fond memories of sneaking malfatti off of cookie sheets from my Grandmother's refrigerator. A couple times of year, she would make large batches of this Italian dish when all of the family was visiting.
Malfatti roughly translates to "poorly made" or "mistake" in Italian. However, the name in no way reflects the taste or the final outcome of this dish. The primary ingredients are ricotta and spinach. There are many variations of the recipe and I am certain region and time contribute to the different versions of malfatti.
I have a copy of my grandmother's recipe but on the day I set out to the store to collect my ingredients, I could not find my coveted recipe box. A week-long frantic search finally uncovered my recipe box but I already reached out to someone I knew would have a superb recipe for malfatti.  Chef and owner of Villa Locale in Las Vegas, Joe Muscaglione, stepped up and did not disappoint with a family recipe he claims is as old as ricotta itself.
Eager to taste this old world dish, I prepared a batch of malfatti one morning for that evening's dinner.  The result? Perfection - the rustic and flavorful ricotta dumplings speckled with green spinach were devoured by my family.  Topped with a light tomato sauce, malfatti is a simple vegetarian dish that all Macaronis will enjoy.
Ingredients:
2 cups fresh ricotta, strained overnight
2 boxes frozen chopped spinach - thawed and drained
2 eggs
1 cup Parmigiano Reggiano
1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 cup flour
salt and pepper to taste

Strain the ricotta overnight in refrigerator. Coffee filters in a colander can be used for if cheesecloth is unavailable. The final mixture should be as dry as possible. This may be why some recipes include breadcrumbs. Combine strained ricotta, spinach the rest of the ingredients in a bowl with your hands. Kids will be happy to help with this part!
The mixture should be combined thoroughly but not over worked.  Shape into meatball sized dumplings and place on a cookie sheet lined with waxed or parchment paper.  Place pan in the refrigerator and allow to sit a few hours. The longer they sit, the better they are. Bring a large pot with water to just under a boil, add a couple of pinches of salt. Gently drop the malfatti into the water to cook. Remove the dumplings with a slotted spoon when they float to the surface. Once strained, serve hot topped with a light tomato sauce.
Although they require advance planning, malfatti are easy to make and offer up an alternative to the basic pasta and sauce.

Saturday, February 19, 2011

Birding 2-19- 2011 : Mountain Falls, Pahrump: (Nye County)

Today February 19, 2011, I birded at places near my home in Mountain Falls. I took pictures of what I believe are Violet Green Swallows, which I know is unusual. To be sure they are not Tree Swallows, I am bringing my media over to Richard and we are going to look at them together. Today I saw swallows with white underbelly, white flanks, very rapid flight.

Birds seen today.
Dark-eyed Junco's (Oregon) (4)
American Wigeons
Mallards
Green-winged Teal's
Bufflehead
Common Merganser (pictures taken)
Ruddy Duck
American Coots
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Say's Phoebe
Common Raven
Swallows (Tree or Violet Green)
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Red-winged Blackbird's
Western Meadowlark
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Monday, February 14, 2011

Birding 2-13- 2011 : Willow Creek: Pahrump: (Nye County)

February 13, 2011 turned out to be a wonderful birding morning.  Full of excitement. The tree's were full of birds this morning. There were calling Red-winged Blackbirds and Crow's waking everyone up.But the most beautiful sound this morning was the clear rich warble of the Western Meadowlark. I started out with the idea of wanting to get a picture of every bird I saw today. The first bird was a White-breasted Nuthatch, and he was way too quick for me with his flying from tree to tree. I did get other pictures as I relaxed with the camera, and found a new excitement at being able to get pictures of birds in flight.

I arrived at 10a.m. at Richard and Carol Cantino's. The Hooded Warbler had just come in and was back out again in the middle of the trees. Richard, had beautiful pictures he had taken this morning of Burrowing Owls. We spent time preparing for the 2011 Great Backyard Bird Count through Cornell.

Richard subscribed to Birds of North America Online and we spent time studying the Red-tailed Hawks. What beautiful pictures! This is definitely something every birder should look at. The Great Backyard Bird Count is Friday February 18 through Monday February 21. I encourage everyone to get out and count the bird's It's great to have birding friends. Carol, reminded me today as she was looking at the male House Sparrow and female House Sparrow how exciting and wonderful it is to be in the presence of a
new birder as we went through the descriptions of what to look for in identifying these birds. I also learned that I need to brush up on my identification skills of Red-tailed Hawks.



Birds seen today on Willow Creek:

Canada Warbler
Mallard
American Wigeon's
Northern Shoveler's
Cooper's Hawk's (2)
Red-shouldered Hawk (1)
American Kestrel's (2)
Gambel's Quail
American Coot's
Mourning Dove's
Eurasian Collared Dove's
Rock Dove's
Anna's Hummingbird
Ladder-backed Woodpecker's (2)a male and a female
Northern Flicker's (3)
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Common Raven
American Crow's
Horned Lark (1)
Verdin
White-breasted Nuthatch
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
European Starling (1)
Cedar Waxwings (13)
Orange-crowned Warbler (1)
Yellow-rumped Warbler (1)
Hooded Warbler (1) male
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco's (Slate-colored) and (Oregon)
Western Meadowlark's
Red-winged Blackbird's
Brewer's Blackbird
Great-tailed Grackle
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
House Sparrow's

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Villa Locale Menu Pics

Pictures of new menu items from southern Nevada's first and only seed to table restaurant -

Villa Locale, Pahrump, Nevada

Visit "menu" for more Pictures

Menu:


Villa Locale Sampler

Eating Las Vegas | Still Life with Bet The Farm Fruit:

Monday, February 07, 2011

Birding: Willow Creek: Pahrump

Birds seen February 6, 2011

Canada Goose (larger ones and smaller ones together) (no Cackling Goose)
Mallard Northern Pintail (female)
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Pied billed Grebe
Great Blue Heron
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk (sitting on the roof of a house checking out its surroundings)
Red-shouldered Hawk
Bald Eagle (immature)
American Kestrel
Gambel's Quail
American Coot
Rock Dove
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Ladder-backed Woodpecker (very active)
Northern Flicker (red shafted)
Say's Phoebe
Horned Lark
American Crow
Verdin
Northern Mockingbird
Western Bluebird Cedar
Waxwing (came in a group landing in tree near where I was sitting)
Phainopepla
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Hooded Warbler (male)
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon)
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Sparrow
Great-tailed Grackle
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch

Submitted by Darlene Feener Pahrump, Nevad



Sunday, January 30, 2011

Cheese making at Villa Locale






Literally meaning recooked, is an Italian cheese typically made from the whey of sheep, cow, goat, or water buffalo milk.

To make the cheese, whey is heated, to a near boiling temperature

Checking the temperature for Villa Locale Ricotta

This curdles the remaining protein from the whey and leads to the formation of Ricotta cheese. Whey has been used in this way since the ancient times, referred to by Cato the Elder





Villa Locale Ricotta is used in restaurant for its stuffed eggplant, cavatelli,  ravioli, manicotti. cannoli, cheesecake, and is available in 24 oz containers to go

Oleanders often get an undeserved bad rap - Living - ReviewJournal.com

Oleanders often get an undeserved bad rap - Living - ReviewJournal.com: "- Sent using Google Toolbar"

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Pahrump Birding

Below is a list of birds seen today at Willow Creek. 1-17-2011

Canada Goose (6) smaller size maybe Richardson's but not sure.
Mallard's
Northern Pintail Female (1) has moved from pump house pond to pond
by Richard and Carol's
American Wigeons (increasing in number)
Northern Shovelers (increasing in number)
Green-winged Teals (increasing in number)
Ring-necked Ducks (increasing in number)
Ruddy Duck traveling across the whole pond to take flight
Pied billed-Grebe
Great Blue Heron neck drawn in, legs extended behind, landing at pond edge
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk at top of fir tree, sailing out across golf course
American Kestrel
Gambel's Quail
American Coots
Rock Doves
Eurasian Collared Doves
Mourning Doves (increasing in numbers)
Anna's Hummingbird
Costa's Hummingbird
Ladder-backed Woodpecker moving upward on bark of tree head first a female
Northern Flickers
Say's Phoebe
Common Raven
Verdin
Northern Mockingbird
American Pipit's (18) moving steadily along the ground feeding
European Starling mixed in with blackbirds
Hooded Warbler, flicking his tail while eating meal worms
Chipping Sparrow at feeders with juncos
White-crowned Sparrow's
House Sparrow's(increasing in numbers)
Dark-eyed Junco's (increasing in numbers) Oregon and Slate colored
Western Meadowlarks (increasing in numbers)
Red-winged Blackbirds darting into the cattails
Brewer's Blackbirds in with Red-winged Blackbirds
Great-tailed Grackle's only a few today
House Finch (increasing in numbers)flying up into trees as I passed them.

Submitted by
Darlene Feener
Pahrump, Nevada